Here’s What Hunter Moore Is Up To Now

Here’s What Hunter Moore Is Up To Now

Published July 28, 2022
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The streamer’s latest true crime docuseries, The Most Hated Man on the Internet, recounts the rise and fall of Moore, the self-proclaimed “professional life ruiner” behind the infamous website IsAnyoneUp.com. The now-defunct forum published people’s explicit images, along with their personal information and social media handles. The site didn’t require that those featured in the images had consented to sharing them; often, the images were submitted by the subjects’ exes, who had received the pictures in confidence — hence why the the site became famous as a destination for revenge porn. Sometimes, the photos had even been stolen from victims’ hacked email accounts.

The site launched in 2010, and was only live for about two years, but had an outsize impact — both for its victims, and its founder. The Most Hated Man on the Internet tells the whole, stranger-than-fiction story.

IsAnyoneUp.com folded in April 2012, but Moore wouldn’t be arrested until some time later. As the documentary chronicles, Charlotte Laws — the mother of a victim — devoted herself to tracking down other victims and gathering evidence of unlawful conduct for the FBI. During her investigation, Laws helped uncover proof that Moore paid a hacker to break into people’s email accounts and steal images to publish on the site.

In January 2014, Moore — and his hacker accomplice, Charles Evens — were indicted in separate Federal Courts in California on charges of “conspiracy, seven counts of unauthorized access to a protected computer to obtain information, and seven counts of aggravated identity theft,” according to the FBI’s press release at the time. A little over a year later, Moore entered into a plea deal, under which he was sentenced to two and a half years in prison followed by three years of supervised release, and ordered to pay a $2,000 fine. He was also required to notify of his probation officer of “every computer, computer-related device, screen name, password, e-mail account or ISP” he used or created during his three years of supervised release, according to his plea deal (which VICE shared in 2015).